Maz Dannourah

Senior Associate

Employment and HR


Employment Law Resolutions 2018

Maz Dannourah

As we say goodbye to 2017 and return to the office following the festivities of Christmas and New Year what will dominate the focus of HR departments in 2018?


General Data Protection Regulations (“GDPR”)

There was much discussion about the GDPR in 2017 ahead of its implementation on 25th May 2018.  Whilst the date of implementation may now seem very close, for those businesses which haven’t yet taken steps to consider their own compliance with the new rules there is still time.  HR managers have a particular interest in the changes given the extent of employee data held by employers.

The new laws will impact the way that personal information is gathered, stored and used. Businesses will be assessing the impact not only to their external communications, but to the data they have on their employees. The new GDPR urges employers to reconsider the way that employee information is documented and stored, how long they should keep it for, and what’s at risk if they aren’t compliant.


If you are not yet ready for these changes, or equipped with a strategy, perhaps our free workshop would be beneficial. With us, you can begin to form your 6 month plan:

http://www.fraserbrown.com/our-events/gdpr-the-workshop-for-businesses

Employment status

The numerous rulings relating to gig economy businesses such as Uber and Deliveroo will continue in 2018.  For some businesses the “status” of its workforce may be of little concern, but for those using casual labour or self employed contractors there will be a need to monitor developments and assess risks.

Poor management and flexible working 


Recent surveys by Investors in People and Timewise suggest that employees will be motivated to look for new jobs in 2018 due to problems with poor management and a desire to work flexibly.  Businesses would be wise to address any examples of poor management given the potential damage to staff morale and performance across the board.  Meeting demands for flexible working may attract and help retain the best staff. 


Sexual harassment


The rise in reported incidents of sexual harassment is likely to continue following the high profile cases raised in 2017.  We have seen increasing numbers of incidents of employees filing grievances and threatening claims which prove a distraction for any business.  Employers who are aware of any potential problems should consider addressing them following grievance and disciplinary procedures as necessary and avoid matters escalating.

There are also methods that you can explore to encourage appropriate behaviour, as outlined in my article http://www.fraserbrown.com/article/christmas-cheer-and-seasonal-woes-in-employment-law

Increasing Employment Tribunal claims

Following the removal of Employment Tribunal fees last summer, there has been a steady increase in the number of claims being issued.  It remains open to debate whether the removal of fees will increase the number of vexatious claims but what is certain is that employees are much more likely to bring claims than in recent years. Prudent employers may have little to fear but employers who may have been tempted to cut corners in light of the barrier of fees should think again.  

Help is at hand

If your business requires assistance with any of the issues discussed above or anything else related to employment and HR, we can help.  We offer advice on an ad hoc basis as required but can also provide a comprehensive, insurance backed employment law service for a fixed fee.  Please call us on 0115 9888 777 or email peaceofmind@fraserbrown.com for further details.

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